By Jason MacKenzie, Managing Partner, Corporate Communications

Real Conservatism helps citizens establish a stake in society – but for more than a decade, Tories have been characterised by their detractors as the Party of austerity. It’s time for the decade of renewal.

The Chancellor, Sajid Javid, unveiled a raft of policy positions this afternoon – and continued the populist (and popular) theme that has run through this Party Conference.

“We are the real party of labour – we are the workers’ Party” announced Javid, substantiating the proposition by noting that the UK is on track to restore housing supply to its highest level since 1970, and announcing a hike of the national living wage to £10.50.

“We need to do more to level the playing field between regions and generations” he declared – and it went down well in the main hall, and beyond.

The outsider cynic may claim that this is simply a ploy to buy votes – but the average swing voter may feel that we’re at an inflection point – a repositioning of Conservatism. No longer the #NastyParty 2.0, the Tories are going to invest in the country once again – and not just in infrastructure, but also in communities.

Where the money will come from for Javid’s proposals is a legitimate question – but what’s certain is that there is a deep-seated conviction that we must rebuild a stakeholder society. If people don’t have a job they value and a chance of home ownership, why would they vote Tory? Conservatism is most attractive to those who have something to conserve.

20,000 more Bobbies on the beat, levelling-up per-pupil funding across the country, and massive investment into the NHS all reaches voters where they’re at. And, if Boris Johnson actually delivers Brexit on 31st October, thus keeping his pledge to the nation, perhaps the nation will trust him to spearhead the decade of renewal.

‘Get a job, get a home and get ahead’ looks like a winning package to me. General Election, anyone?

Photo: Sajid Javid’s @twitter feed.